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Author Archives: Paul Tarini

Reflecting on the Great Challenges at TEDMED

Oct 6, 2014, 11:19 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

TEDMED 2014 photo w/Ramanan Laxminarayan Photo courtesy of TEDMED

Here at RWJF, we are working to build a Culture of Health for all. This is an audacious goal, and one that we clearly cannot accomplish alone. We need to collaborate with thinkers and tinkerers and doers from all sectors–which is why we sponsored TEDMED’s exploration of the Great Challenges of Health and Medicine at its 2014 events.

Specifically, RWJF representatives helped facilitate conversations around six Great Challenges: childhood obesity, engaging patients, medical innovation, health care costs, the impact that poverty has on health, and prevention. We spoke with hundreds of people in person and online (Get a glimpse of the conversation here).

We asked three TEDMED speakers from RWJF's network to reflect on their experience at TEDMED and share some of the stimulating ideas they heard. We hope you'll add your ideas in the comments. 

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Big Strides in Community-Level Interventions at Health Datapalooza

Jun 10, 2014, 2:38 PM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Paul Tarini, Susan Dentzer, Dwayne Spradlin, Greg Downing, and David Vockell discuss harnessing data for health on an RWJF First Friday Hangout

As co-chair of the Community Track at this year’s Health Datapalooza conference, I was impressed by the strong sense of purpose I felt among the attendees. The conversation has clearly moved from the abstract concepts of gathering and accessing data, to how we can use that data to solve real-world challenges. The launch of a new network to bring together researchers, scientists and companies and accelerate research using personal health data, led by the Health Data Exploration project with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, was one of many efforts designed to directly improve our understanding of health through the wise use of data.

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Explore Opportunities and Trends at Health Datapalooza

Apr 28, 2014, 8:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

HDP banner 022014

We’re a little over a month away from the 2014 Health Datapalooza (HDP) conference. For those of you who don’t know, HDP—an event of the Health Data Consortium, which RWJF supports—is a great venue to explore the opportunities and trends of open health data.

Trying to get a firm understanding of this space can be challenging, but HDP brings it all together. The conference has tracks focusing on the use of open data by businesses and consumers, in community and clinical settings, and for research purposes.

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Entrepreneurs and Underserved Communities: StartUp Health's New Accelerator

Feb 18, 2014, 8:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Members of the public stand at tables at a polling center, signing in to vote and have flu vaccinations

The past few years have been marked with a surge in health care business accelerators—programs that provide support to help health care entrepreneurs develop their ideas and raise initial funding. In tracking the success of these innovation hubs, we realized something was missing.

On the complex journey of taking a health care idea to market, most entrepreneurs aren’t seeing underserved communities—the people and the providers who serve them—as target markets. The result is that health care innovations are passing by some of the communities that could benefit the most from innovation. But what if we could help entrepreneurs see these patients and their providers as a viable market? What if we could make it easier for health care businesses to design solutions for the needs of our most vulnerable populations?

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And the Winner is … Streetlights, for Applying Big Data to Community Health

Jan 15, 2014, 12:41 PM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Cropped Streetlight project

Big data, the buzzword of choice these days in information technology, holds the promise of transforming health care as programmers and policy-makers figure out how to mine trillions of ones and zeros for information about the best (and worst) health practices, disease and lifestyle trends, interconnections, and insights. The problem is, where to start? To jump start the process, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation joined in a Knight News Challenge: Health and issued its own call to developers to come up with innovative ways to combine public health and health care data, with a $50,000 prize to the best idea.

The results are in. When the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation announced the winners of its News Challenge for ideas focused on unlocking the power of health data on January 15—you can see the list here—we also announced the winner of our companion prize for the best entries who combined public health data with data from health care to improve the health of communities. Our first place winner is the Streetlights Project from Chicago.

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Engaging Patients in Research

Dec 3, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

What happens when you engage patients in research? That’s a question RWJF is exploring with grants to Sage Bionetworks and PatientsLikeMe to build online, open-source platforms that give patients the opportunity to contribute to and collaborate on research.

Sage Bionetworks’ BRIDGE platform will allow patients to share and track their health data and collaborate on research into diseases and health problems that matter most to them. Three research projects will be piloted on BRIDGE in the coming year, focusing on diabetes, Fanconi anemia and sleeping disorders.

PatientsLikeMe’s Open Research Exchange (ORE) will give researchers and patients a space to work together to develop health outcome measures that better reflect outcomes that are meaningful to patients. After several months building the ORE, PatientsLikeMe is now in testing mode, putting the platform through its paces. But it’s not just an academic exercise. PatientsLikeMe has recruited four researchers to pilot the ORE. These researchers will be providing feedback on the site while working with patients in the PatientsLikeMe network to develop and test an initial set of health outcome measures.

Sage Bionetwork’s Stephen Friend discusses collaboration between patients and researchers

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Move Over, Richard Kiley. Here’s Why We Want to Combine Public Health Data with Health Care Data

Aug 19, 2013, 9:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Visualizations of health data at Calit2

We’re announcing today a new $100,000 prize as part of the Knight Foundation’s latest News Challenge, which seeks innovative ideas to harness information and data for the health of communities. The RWJF award is for those entrants who combine public health data with data from health care to improve the health of communities. The Knight Foundation itself has committed $2 million to the contest, as well.

The reason we want to combine public health data with health care data is because of the potential the combined data has to drive real improvements and innovation. When we were discussing this, one of my colleagues broke out with “To dream the impossible dream.” While he couldn’t match Kiley’s sonorous baritone, he did capture the ambition in the song.

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What's Next Health: Moving Into a World of Exponential Change

Jun 21, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Paul Tarini Senior Program Officer Paul Tarini

Each month, What’s Next Health talks with leading thinkers about the future of health and health care. Recently, we talked with Daniel Kraft, medicine and neuroscience chair at Singularity University and executive director of FutureMed, about the potential of exponential technologies to accelerate change. In this post, Senior Program Officer Paul Tarini reflects on Daniel's visit to the Foundation.

When we look at new technology, especially health care technology, we often ignore expense for the excitement of the new. More than one paper has been written citing new technology as an underlying driver of rising health care costs. 

Some of this is the result of the problems we want our technology to solve. We tend to lean toward developing and employing new technologies that are “heavy” interventions against a particular disease, and those technologies are more likely to be expensive.  

But when you start looking at technologies that are more about helping people live healthier lives, more behavioral, more wellness facing, these will likely be less expensive and their impact will be more exponential.

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Dispatches from Datapalooza: Conversation After Conversation

Jun 7, 2013, 3:29 PM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Pioneer Senior Program Officer Paul Tarini at Datapalooza Pioneer Senior Program Officer Paul Tarini at Health Datapalooza IV. Photo by Saad Zafar.

From: Paul Tarini

To: Christine Nieves, Beth Toner and Thomas Goetz

Date: June 7, 2013

Thomas, I agree with your description that Health Datapalooza is the place to be. For me, this year's conference was a great experience and offered a really rich environment for networking. At RWJF's booth and throughout the conference, I had conversation after conversation with a range of people who are interested in liberating data and using liberated data. I talked with researchers, entrepreneurs, health care providers, people from state and federal government, and representatives from large corporations. It was really quite impressive.

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Dispatches from Datapalooza: The New Frontier in Health

May 30, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Paul Tarini

From: Paul Tarini

To: Christine Nieves, Beth Toner and Thomas Goetz

Date: May 30, 2013

I'm looking forward to my third Datapalooza conference next week. In many ways, data is the new frontier in helping people lead healthier lives and improving the quality and efficiency of care. I enjoy Datapalooza because it helps us see the current edge of this new frontier—from what data are available and what data people are trying to access, to new ideas about how people are using the data, whether it's for policy or for products and services.

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