Category Archives: Executive Nurse Fellows

Nov 26 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The November 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the November issue.

RWJF Grantees Help Veterans Become Nurses
With unemployment a problem for many veterans, nurse educators are launching innovative programs to turn veterans into nurses—a “win-win” solution for the military, the health care system and patients, proponents say. The programs address both the looming nurse shortage and the fact that veterans cannot get academic credit for health care experiences that took place in the battlefield.

‘Ebola Care is Nursing Care’
The Ebola outbreak is shining a spotlight on the critical—but often unseen—work of nursing in the United States and abroad, nurse leaders say. Nurses are mounting the main caregiving response to the deadly virus, according to Sheila Davis, DNP, ANP-BC, FAAN, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow who recently returned from Liberia and Sierra Leone. Nurses also are educating the public about how the disease is transmitted and dispelling sometimes-unfounded fears.

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Nov 19 2014
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The Imperative to Improve Health Literacy

Joy P. Deupree, PhD, MSN, APRN-BC, is an assistant professor at the University of Alabama (UAB) School of Nursing and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellow. She is engaged in community participatory research studies on health literacy. For 12 years, Deupree has taught a campus-wide elective on health literacy and has been a guest lecturer on the topic at the UAB schools of medicine, dentistry and public health. She founded the Alliance of International Nurses for Improved Health Literacy and established a nursing special interest group for the Health Literacy Annual Research Conference.

Joy Deupree

Health literacy is extremely important to building a culture of health. Basic understanding of health care information is essential if people are to live healthy lives, but an alarming number of American adults report poor understanding of health care instructions. 

This year marks the 10-year anniversary of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion.While progress has been made, the work has really just begun. We can no longer blame the patient for poor health literacy, and we should keep in mind that limited health literacy affects us as all and contributes to increased health care costs. 

American Public Health Association Meeting & Expo

The IOM report defines health literacy as “the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.” These skills involve not only reading ability but also numeracy. Failure to develop the necessary skills to manage health care can cost millions of dollars as well as add to human suffering and even cause death.

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Nov 13 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: EpiPens in schools, suicide prevention, financial incentives for wellness, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

A study by RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH, shows that keeping supplies of epinephrine, commonly known as EpiPens, in schools saves lives, Health Day reports. Epinephrine injections are given in response to life-threatening allergic reactions to food or to insect stings. Gupta’s study found that epinephrine was administered to 35 children and three adults in Chicago public schools during the 2012-13 school year. “We were surprised to see that of those who received the epinephrine, more than half of the reactions were first-time incidents,” Gupta said. “Many children are trying foods for the first time at school, and therefore it is critical that schools are prepared for a possible anaphylactic reaction.”  Forty-one states have laws recommending schools stock epinephrine, according to the article.

Matt Wray, PhD, MA, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus, writes in Medical Xpress that when it comes to preventing suicides, it’s important to focus some attention on how a person seeks to end his or her life. According to the article, suicide-prevention research has shown that when people who have begun to act on suicidal impulses find that access to their chosen method is blocked, many do not seek out other means. “Most people don’t have a backup plan,” Wray writes. “So when their initial attempt is stalled, the destructive impulse often passes. Moreover, contrary to what many believe, people who attempt suicide more than once are rare. Less than 10 percent of those who survive an attempt ever end up dying by suicide.”

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Nov 6 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Simulating combat conditions for medical and nursing students, enriched maternity care, GMO confusion and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

An article on dcmilitary.com describes a recent training exercise conducted for medical and nursing students at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU). The students cared for “patients” under simulated combat conditions that included mock explosions and casualties, operational problems, and reality-based missions. Arthur Kellermann, MD, MPH, dean of the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine of USU, noted that while the exercise is focused on enhancing leadership and patient care skills, students are also practicing cultural sensitivity and problem-solving abilities. “All of this is wrapped into an incredibly challenging series of unfolding scenarios,” Kellermann said. “They are constantly being thrown problems. They have to adapt and learn to work with one another in a variety of ways and a variety of combinations.” Kellerman is an alumnus of the RWJF Clinical Scholars and Health Policy Fellows programs. Read more from Kellermann on the Human Capital Blog.

A study by Sara Rosenbaum, JD, examines the challenge of maintaining and coordinating “enriched health care” for pregnant women in California who purchase subsidized coverage from Covered California, the state’s health care exchange, and are also eligible for the state’s Medicaid program (Medi-Cal) and the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program (CPSP) it offers. Science Daily reports that CPSP makes enriched maternity care available to pregnant women facing elevated health, environmental and social risks due to their economic status. Researchers compared maternity care under the two programs and identified a number of care coordination and integration challenges. Rosenbaum is an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. 

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Oct 31 2014
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RWJF Milestones, October 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Linda Aiken, PhD, FAAN, FRCN, RN, has won the Institute of Medicine’s Leinhard Award in recognition of her “rigorous research demonstrating the importance of nursing care and work environments in achieving safe, effective, patient-centered, and affordable health care.” The director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Aiken serves on the National Advisory Committee of the RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and is a research manager for the Future of Nursing National Research Agenda.

A number of RWJF Scholars and Fellows were recently elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine:

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Oct 24 2014
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Working Together to Draw More Nurses to Public Health

Patricia Drehobl, MPH, RN, is associate director for program development at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC). She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows program (2007-2010).

Patricia Drehobl

Human Capital Blog: CDC is engaging in new partnerships with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to promote public health nursing. How did the new collaboration come about?

Pat Drehobl: CDC has funded some national academic associations for many years, including the Association of Schools of Public Health, the Association of Prevention Teaching and Research, and the Association of American Medical Colleges. We recognized the need to include nursing representation because nursing is the largest discipline in the public health workforce. We added AACN as a partner in 2012 when we developed our funding opportunity announcement to work with academic partners.

HCB: Why did CDC decide to reach out to the nursing community in 2012?

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Oct 17 2014
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RWJF’s Lavizzo-Mourey, Nursing Grantees Honored by American Academy of Nursing

Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), was honored by the American Academy of Nursing (AAN) yesterday, receiving the President’s Award from the venerable institution.

F1a_Risa-030

The presentation was made by AAN President Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, at its conference, Transforming Health, Driving Policy Conference. Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, spoke to the assembled conference participants via video. “At the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, we like to say that nursing is in our DNA. That’s because we believe to our core that nurses are the glue that holds together our health care system across the entire continuum of an individual’s lifespan ... We envision a future where all Americans realize a new and robust Culture of Health ... We cannot and we will not ever achieve a Culture of Health without the support, help and the leadership of nurses.”

“I am grateful to be honored with this award,” Lavizzo-Mourey continued. “And know that you are all committed to transforming health, leading change, influencing policy, and ultimately improving the nation’s health ... And I am humbled to be in the company of this year’s FAAN inductees and the Living Legend honorees who will be recognized tonight. Congratulations to everyone – and a shout-out to those who are RWJF scholars, fellows and alumni.”

Some 170 people will be inducted as fellows of AAN (FAANs) tomorrow. They include four RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows, eight RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars, two RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative investigators, and Mary Dickow, MPA, the statewide director of the California Action Coalition of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

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Oct 9 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: The nurse faculty shortage, teaching empathy, a link between overtime and diabetes, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

ABC News explores the nation’s nursing workforce shortage, focusing specifically on the faculty shortage at nursing schools. “Suddenly, we turned around and realized we’re not attracting enough nurses to go into teaching,” said Kimberly Glassman, PhD, RN, chief nursing officer at NYU Langone Medical Center. “The fear is we will have to shrink the number of nurses we can prepare for the future at a time when we need to prepare more.” Glassman is an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow. The article was republished by Yahoo News and ABC News Radio.

RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus Allison Aiello, PhD, MS, is interviewed for an NBC News story on Enterovirus D-68. She recommends that parents consider getting flu shots for their children, noting that preventing children from getting the flu should help make Enterovirus less complicated to diagnose and treat. The video is available here.

RWJF Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program scholar Paloma Toledo, MD, co-authors a Huffington Post blog entry on the need for medical schools to teach students to be empathetic. Over the course of their training, they become less empathetic, as opposed to more empathetic, and the reasons for this are unclear,” Toledo writes, recommending lectures on active listening and communication skills, among other measures. 

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Oct 8 2014
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Proud to be ‘The Nurse on the Board’!

This week marks the 4th anniversary of the Institute of Medicine’s future of nursing report. Fran Roberts, PhD, RN, FAAN, is owner and executive leader of the Fran Roberts Group, a consulting and contracting practice providing expertise on health care leadership, higher education, governance, regulation and patient safety. The Kate Aurelius Visiting Professor for the University of Arizona College of Medicine–Phoenix, Roberts serves on the boards of directors of several health care organizations, including the Presbyterian Central New Mexico Health System. She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive News Fellows program.

Fran Roberts

“Leadership from nurses is needed at every level and across all settings.” That’s what the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing panel wrote in its 2011 report—a message I’ve taken to heart. Here’s why the IOM was exactly right.

I’ve served (and still serve) on several health-related boards, in most cases as the only nurse in a group dominated by physicians, local business leaders, and administrators. My experience on the Presbyterian Central New Mexico Healthcare Services board, which I now chair, is both representative and instructive. I joined the board about eight years ago, recruited by one of my colleagues in the RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program, Kathy Davis, RN, the senior vice president and chief nursing officer at Presbyterian.

It was an honor to be asked, doubly so because I live and work out of state. But Presbyterian had concluded that it needed a nurse with executive experience on its board, so I got the call.

I started my first term on the board determined not to pigeon-hole myself as “the nurse on the board.” I didn’t want my fellow board members to think I had tunnel vision, unable to see beyond the need to advocate for nurses. That’s not to say I didn’t intend to advocate for nurses when that was called for, but I didn’t want to be limited to that, either in my colleagues’ estimation or in reality.

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Oct 2 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Autism and birth order, nurse staffing and underweight infants, long-term care insurance, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

There is an increased risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) among children born less than one year or more than five years after the birth of their next oldest sibling, Forbes reports. The study, led by RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna Keely Cheslack-Postava, PhD, MSPH, analyzed the records of 7,371 children born between 1987 and 2005, using data from the Finnish Prenatal Study of Autism. About a third of the children had been diagnosed with ASD by 2007. Researchers found that the risk of ASD for children born less than 12 months after their prior sibling was 50 percent higher than it was for children born two to five years after their prior sibling. “The theory is that the timing between pregnancies changes the prenatal environment for the developing fetus,” Cheslack-Postava said. 

The health outcomes and quality of care for underweight black infants could greatly improve with more nurses on staff at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, according to a study funded by RWJF’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI). The study, led by Eileen Lake, PhD, RN, FAAN, found that nurse understaffing and practice environments were worse at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, contributing to adverse outcomes for very low birthweight babies born in those facilities, reports Health Canal. More information is available on the INQRI Blog. The study was covered by Advance Healthcare Network for Nurses, among other outlets.

Because of a “medical-industrial complex” that provides financial incentives to overuse and fragment health care, patients nearing the end of their lives need an advocate to fight for their interests, Joan Teno, MD, MS, writes in an opinion piece for the New York Times. Teno encourages readers to “find a family member or friend who can advocate for the health care that you want and need. Find someone to ask the hard questions: What is your prognosis? What are the benefits and risks of treatments? Find someone not afraid of white coats.” Teno is an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. 

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