Category Archives: Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program

Apr 18 2014
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New on the RWJF Website

Two stories on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) website report on new research by RWJF scholars.

An Incentive for Healthier Living: RWJF Scholars Find a Stronger Link Between Obesity and Kidney Disease

Vanessa Grubbs, MD, MPH, and Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, MD, PhD, both alumnae of the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (AMFDP), have discovered that obesity appears to be a driver of diminished kidney function, independent of a number of common kidney conditions. This suggests that overweight patients could face kidney troubles even if they avoid hypertension, diabetes, or other such conditions. The researchers also found that the standard measure used to gauge kidney function might miss early signals of deterioration that a more sensitive test can detect. This suggests that clinicians could identify emerging problems in otherwise asymptomatic patients, and help steer them toward healthier habits early in life.

Reducing Adolescents’ Risky Behaviors

New studies from RWJF scholars seek early markers for substance abuse, explore young adult sleep patterns, and gather data on health care providers’ counseling. RWJF Health & Society Scholar Julie Maslowsky, PhD, and colleagues found that mental health problems in eighth graders are a likely marker for subsequent substance abuse issues. In a separate study, Maslowsky’s research team studied the sleep patterns of more than 15,000 teens, because getting too little or too much sleep is related to a number of mental and physical health problems, including depression and anxiety. The same story reports on a survey by Aletha Akers, MD, MPH, an AMFDP alumna, examining the counseling health care providers give to parents of adolescent patients. The topics parents most frequently recalled discussing were the ones least associated with adolescent morbidity.

Apr 2 2014
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RWJF Milestones, April 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Susan B. Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, RWJF’s senior advisor for nursing and director of its Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, has been named co-chair of the newly formed External Nurse Advisory Board (ENAB) for the Center for Nursing Advancement (CFNA) at UnitedHealth Group. The goal of the ENAB is to “inform, create and evolve nursing best practices, and advance the nursing profession.”

Angelina Jolie has signed on as executive producer of Difret, a film by RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumna Mehret Mandefro, MD, MSc, AB. The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January, where it won the World Cinema Dramatic Audience Award, then went on to receive the Audience Award at the Berlin International Film Festival in February. The film tells the story of a young Ethiopian girl who challenges the tradition of “telefa,” the practice of abduction in marriage, usually of young girls. Read more about Mandefro’s film.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has voted Juliann Sebastian, PhD, MSN, its president-elect. Sebastian, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows alumna, is dean of the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing. She will serve as president of AACN from 2016 to 2018. The organization represents more than 740 nursing schools nationwide.

RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna Jacqueline Stevens, PhD, has been named a 2013 Guggenheim Fellow for the Humanities. Her fellowship is in U.S. History.

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Mar 27 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Cultural barriers to care, medical conspiracies, parenting, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

In a Talking Points Memo opinion piece, Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program alumna Paloma Toledo, MD, MPH, writes that while the Affordable Care Act holds the promise of greatly increasing access to care, language and cultural barriers could still stand between Hispanic Americans and quality care. Toledo’s research into why greater numbers of Hispanic women decline epidurals during childbirth revealed that many made the choice due to unfounded worries that it would leave them with chronic back pain or paralysis, or that it would harm their babies. “As physicians, we should ensure that patients understand their pain management choices,” she writes.

More than one in three patients with bloodstream infections receives incorrect antibiotic therapy in community hospitals, according to research conducted by Deverick J. Anderson, MD, an RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumnus. Anderson says “it’s a challenge to identify bloodstream infections and treat them quickly and appropriately, but this study shows that there is room for improvement,” reports MedPage Today. Infection Control Today, FierceHealthcare, and HealthDay News also covered Anderson’s findings.

People’s health and wellness can be linked to their zip codes as much as to their genetic codes, according to an essay in Social Science and Medicine co-authored by Helena Hansen, MD, PhD. As a result, Hansen argues, physicians should be trained to understand and identify the social factors that can make their patients sick, HealthLeaders Media reports. Hansen is an RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumna.

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Mar 21 2014
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The Lucky One

Vanessa Grubbs, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, and a scholar with the RWJF Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program. She is writing a book about what she calls the “sometimes irrational use of dialysis in America,” which will include a version of this narrative essay.

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It is a Monday afternoon like any other and time to make my weekly rounds at the San Francisco General Hospital outpatient dialysis center. I push my cart of medical charts down the long aisle of our L-shaped dialysis unit and see Mr. Rojas, my dialysis patient for over a year now. He is in his mid-40s and slender, sitting in the burgundy-colored vinyl recliner. His blue-jeaned legs and sneakered feet are propped up on the extended leg rest. The top of his head shines through thinning salt and pepper hair. White earbud headphones peek through gray sideburns. He is looking intently at his Kindle, rarely glancing up at the activity around him.

I roll my cart up to his recliner, catching his eye. His right hand removes the earbuds as the left pauses his movie. He looks up at me, smiling. “Hola, Doctora. How are you?” he says with emphasis on the “are.”

“I am good. How are you doing?” I smile back at him as I grab his chart from the rack. I write down his blood pressure and pulse—both normal—and the excellent blood flow displayed on the dialysis machine. My eyes shift to his fistula, the surgically thickened vein robustly coursing halfway up his left forearm like a slithering garden snake. It is beautiful to me. Through it, Mr. Rojas is connected to the dialysis machine.

“I am good, Doctora. No problems. I feel healthy. Strong.” His brown eyes glint.

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Feb 6 2014
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Human Capital News Roundup: Avoiding aneurysms, healthy food, gun safety, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

In a Huffington Post Latino Voices blog, Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program alumna Paloma Toledo, MD, discusses obesity among Hispanic Americans and how parents can influence children’s behavior, particularly regarding physical activity. She also flags influences that impede efforts to improve health for Hispanic youth: “In the U.S., food advertising on Spanish-language television is more likely to promote nutritionally-poor food than English-language advertising, hindering Hispanic children.”

During months when low-income individuals have access to Earned Income Tax Credit benefits, they spend more on healthy food, according to a study by RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, PhD. The study suggests that people with low incomes also buy more healthy food when their income increases, reports the Wall Street Journal Real Time Economics blog.

Health care professionals could make a vital contribution to educating children about the dangers of gun-related injuries, according to a study by RWFJ Clinical Scholar John Leventhal, PhD. He told Fox News: “Pediatricians and other health care providers can play an important role in preventing these injuries through counseling about firearm safety, including safe storage.”

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Feb 4 2014
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RWJF Milestones, February 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Former New Orleans Health Commissioner Karen DeSalvo, MD, MPH, MSc, is now leading the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology in Washington, D.C. An RWJF Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar alumna, DeSalvo also was recently named one of Governing Magazine’s nine public officials of the year

Brendan G. Carr, MD, MA, MS, assistant professor of emergency medicine and epidemiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has been named director of the federal Emergency Care Coordination Center (ECCC). The ECCC was created by presidential directive to improve national preparedness and response by promoting research, regional partnerships, and effective emergency medical systems. Carr is an RWJF Clinical Scholars alumna.

RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program alumna Ann Cashion, PhD, RN, FAAN, has been named scientific director of the National Institute of Nursing Research’s (NINR) Division of Intramural Research. Cashion was formerly a senior advisor to the NINR Office of the Director. Cashion’s research expertise focuses on genetic markers that predict clinical outcomes.

Pamela Jeffries, PhD, RN, ANEF, has been named the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing’s first vice provost for digital initiatives. Jeffries, a professor and associate dean for academic affairs, will remain on the faculty at the School of Nursing. She is an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program alumna.

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Jan 9 2014
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Human Capital News Roundup: Demand for minority physicians, ADHD treatment, anxiety and strokes, and more

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

Newly insured patients need time to adjust to not using emergency care as a primary medical service, Sara Rosenbaum, JD, recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, told the New York Times. A study co-authored by Amy Finkelstein, PhD, MPhil, also a recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award, found that newly insured Medicaid recipients in Oregon went to the emergency room (ER) more often than people without insurance. The finding raises doubts about whether expanded insurance coverage will help control ER costs, at least in the short term. This story was also covered by NPR, NBC News, and CBS News.

Doctors who are Black, Hispanic, and Asian provide the most care to minority patients, and demand for their services may increase as the Affordable Care Act provides health insurance coverage to those who are currently without it, Bloomberg News reports. The story is based on a study co-authored by Steffie Woolhandler, MD, MPH, an RWJF Health Policy Fellows alumna. It was also covered by WBUR in Boston and The Charlotte Post.

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Dec 19 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: Body mass index and kidney function, impact of health spending on life expectancy, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

The Food & Drug Administration issued a proposed rule on December 16 that would require makers of antimicrobial and antibacterial soaps and body washes to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of their products, the Examiner reports. Scientists have long been concerned that the common anti-bacterial ingredient triclosan may harm health. Allison Aiello, PhD, MS, concluded in a 2007 report that soaps containing triclosan “were no more effective than plain soap at preventing infectious illness symptoms and reducing bacterial levels on the hands.” Aiello is an RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumna. Read her post on the RWJF Human Capital Blog.

In the first study to estimate health spending efficiency by gender across industrialized nations, RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus Arijit Nandi, PhD, and others discovered significant disparities within countries. The research team found that increased spending on health brought stronger gains in life expectancy for men than for women in nearly every nation, Newswise reports. The United States ranked 25th among the 27 countries studied when it came to reducing women’s deaths.

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Dec 16 2013
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Explaining the Link between Income, Race, and Susceptibility to Kidney Disease

Deidra Crews, MD, ScM, an alumna of the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (2009-2013), was named the 2013-2015 Gilbert S. Omenn Anniversary Fellow at the prestigious Institute of Medicine. Among her current research is a study examining the association between unhealthy diet and kidney disease among low-income individuals.

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Human Capital Blog: Congratulations on your fellowship! What are your priorities for the coming year?

Deidra Crews: Over the next two years, I'll be participating in different activities of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). I'll be working with IOM committees and participating in roundtables and workshops. That's the main function of the fellowship. The great thing about it is I'll get to experience firsthand the activities of IOM and hopefully contribute to one or more of the reports that will come out of the IOM over the next couple of years. Because of my interest in disparities in chronic kidney disease, I will be working with the committee on social and behavioral domains for electronic health records, which falls under the IOM board of population health and public health practice. We will be making recommendations on which social and behavioral factors should be tracked in patients' electronic health records.

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Nov 14 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: Retail clinics, urban crime, diversity in medicine, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

As the demand for nurses continues to grow and more people go into the field, it is important to encourage a focus on community-based health and population health, Yvonne VanDyke, MSN, RN, told Austin, Texas, NBC affiliate KXAN. Van Dyke is an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow and senior vice president of the Seton Clinical Education Center in Austin, which is seeking to increase the number of nurses earning Bachelor of Science in Nursing degrees.

A new program funded by the RWJF New Jersey Health Initiatives (NJHI) is enlisting ex-military members to help enroll people in insurance plans in the state. NJHI Director Robert Atkins, PhD, RN, an RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholar alumnus, told New Jersey Spotlight that veterans are well suited to the job of insurance-application counselors because “they know about service, they know about working in teams.” The New Jersey Hospital Association is hiring 25 veterans as certified applications counselors with the $1.8 million NJHI grant.

Diverse Education profiles RWJF Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Scholar alumnus and National Advisory Committee member Levi Watkins Jr., MD, about his work to promote diversity at Johns Hopkins Hospital. “The best way to recruit minority students is by example … and the intervention of mentors,” Watkins said. “Students don’t look at recruitment and diversity offices when they are choosing schools, but they want to see if there are faculty and students in the place that look like them.”

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