Category Archives: Media Coverage

Nov 6 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: Simulating combat conditions for medical and nursing students, enriched maternity care, GMO confusion and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

An article on dcmilitary.com describes a recent training exercise conducted for medical and nursing students at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU). The students cared for “patients” under simulated combat conditions that included mock explosions and casualties, operational problems, and reality-based missions. Arthur Kellermann, MD, MPH, dean of the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine of USU, noted that while the exercise is focused on enhancing leadership and patient care skills, students are also practicing cultural sensitivity and problem-solving abilities. “All of this is wrapped into an incredibly challenging series of unfolding scenarios,” Kellermann said. “They are constantly being thrown problems. They have to adapt and learn to work with one another in a variety of ways and a variety of combinations.” Kellerman is an alumnus of the RWJF Clinical Scholars and Health Policy Fellows programs. Read more from Kellermann on the Human Capital Blog.

A study by Sara Rosenbaum, JD, examines the challenge of maintaining and coordinating “enriched health care” for pregnant women in California who purchase subsidized coverage from Covered California, the state’s health care exchange, and are also eligible for the state’s Medicaid program (Medi-Cal) and the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program (CPSP) it offers. Science Daily reports that CPSP makes enriched maternity care available to pregnant women facing elevated health, environmental and social risks due to their economic status. Researchers compared maternity care under the two programs and identified a number of care coordination and integration challenges. Rosenbaum is an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. 

Read more

Oct 30 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: Scapegoating EHRs, Ebola fears, children fighting cancer, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

In an article published in Healthcare IT News, David Blumenthal, MD, MPP, writes that health care providers may be too quick to blame Electronic Health Records (EHR) for medical errors. Blumenthal notes that EHRs are still imperfect and that improvements will take time, but argues: “There is no going back in the electronic health information revolution. No physician or hospital, however loud their complaints, has ever thrown out their EHR and returned to paper. The dissatisfaction with the technology will recede as EHRs improve, and as a new generation of young clinicians, raised in the electronic world, populates our health care system.”  Blumenthal is president of The Commonwealth Fund, former National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient.

In a blog published by the Washington Post’s “Monkey Cage,” Shana Gadarian, PhD, and her co-author write that Ebola anxiety, while potentially misplaced and harmful, is likely to have an impact on whom Americans trust to handle the disease and what kinds of policies they will support to fight it. The authors have studies society’s reactions to small pox and H1N1 flu. “In general we find that anxiety makes people more supportive of government playing an expansive role in protecting them during a health crisis ... we think our study and the current Ebola outbreak both emphasize that people will rally around experts and increase their support for policies that fight the contagion, even if they hurt civil liberties. Let us hope that the U.S. health system is ultimately worthy of the confidence the public has in it.” Gadarian is an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna.

Read more

Oct 23 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: CPR for Ebola patients, freezing women’s eggs, the inevitability of failure, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

The New York Times reports on remarks by medical ethicist Joseph J. Fins, MD, in which he calls for clearer guidance on whether clinicians should administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to Ebola patients whose hearts stop beating. In a commentary published on the Hastings Center Report website, and cited by the Times, Fins argues against administering CPR because of the danger of transmission of the virus to clinicians, the slim likelihood that Ebola patients will recover, and other clinical factors. Fins, an RWJF  Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient, urges a dialogue on the question leading to clear guidelines from hospitals and government officials.

In an article for CNN, Rene Almeling, PhD, and co-authors say that while Apple and Facebook made headlines last week for offering to cover costs for their female employees to freeze their eggs, people should be suspicious of egg-freezing as a “solution.” The technology carries risk and has high rates of failure, they write. “But even if the technology were perfect, the proposal to help women put motherhood on ice so they can focus on their jobs is shortsighted,” they add. “[R]ather than making fundamental changes to the structure of work in our society to accommodate women’s reproductive years, technological optimists reach for an engineering solution. ... Instead, the goal should be to build systems of production that allow us to live our lives without constantly watching the clock.” Almeling is an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna.

The consumption of sugar-sweetened soda might be promoting disease independent of its role in obesity, according to a study co-authored by RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumni Belinda Needham, PhD, MA, and David Rehkopf, ScD, MPH. The study shows that telomeres—the protective units of DNA that cap the ends of chromosomes in cells—were shorter in the white blood cells of survey participants who reported drinking more soda, Science Blog reports. Shorter telomeres have been linked to a number of chronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes and some types of cancer.

Read more

Oct 16 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: Ebola safeguards, pay-for-performance, brain development and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

PBS NewsHour interviews Howard Markel, MD, PhD, FAAP, on whether hospitals, doctors and nurses are sufficiently prepared to handle Ebola cases in the United States, and what measures should be taken to increase safety. “As someone who studies epidemics, there’s always lots of fear, scapegoating and blame,” Markel, an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient, said. “American tolerance for anything less than perfection has only shortened. The incredible thing to focus on is that so little has happened, so few cases have spread here.” The video is available here and an accompanying article is available here. Markel is also quoted in an Ebola story in the New Republic and wrote a blog for the Huffington Post.

In an article for Forbes magazine, RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient Peter Ubel, MD, discusses whether pay-for-performance health care models can lead to overdiagnosis and overuse of antibiotics. He cites recent journal articles suggesting that sepsis may be over diagnosed in hospitals because the institutions receive higher reimbursements for sepsis patients than for those with milder infections. “In other words, it pays not to miss sepsis diagnoses,” Ubel writes. “Because of the inherent subjectivity of medical diagnoses, those groups that assess health care quality need to remain on the alert for the unintended consequences of their measures. And those insurers and regulators eager to establish clinical care mandates? They need to slow down and make sure their administrative fixes do not create undue side effects.” Ubel also wrote a separate Forbes article on health insurance turnover.

Recent research on children who began life in overcrowded Romanian orphanages shows that early childhood neglect is associated with changes in brain structure, Science Times reports. A study co-authored by RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna Margaret Sheridan, PhD, finds that children who spent their early years in Romanian orphanages have thinner brain tissue in cortical areas that correspond to impulse control and attention, providing support for a link between the early environment and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Researchers compared brain scans from 58 children who spent at least some time in institutions with scans of 22 non-institutionalized children from nearby communities, all between the ages of 8 and 10. The article notes that the study is among the first to document how social deprivation in early life affects the thickness of the cortex.

Read more

Oct 9 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: The nurse faculty shortage, teaching empathy, a link between overtime and diabetes, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

ABC News explores the nation’s nursing workforce shortage, focusing specifically on the faculty shortage at nursing schools. “Suddenly, we turned around and realized we’re not attracting enough nurses to go into teaching,” said Kimberly Glassman, PhD, RN, chief nursing officer at NYU Langone Medical Center. “The fear is we will have to shrink the number of nurses we can prepare for the future at a time when we need to prepare more.” Glassman is an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow. The article was republished by Yahoo News and ABC News Radio.

RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus Allison Aiello, PhD, MS, is interviewed for an NBC News story on Enterovirus D-68. She recommends that parents consider getting flu shots for their children, noting that preventing children from getting the flu should help make Enterovirus less complicated to diagnose and treat. The video is available here.

RWJF Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program scholar Paloma Toledo, MD, co-authors a Huffington Post blog entry on the need for medical schools to teach students to be empathetic. Over the course of their training, they become less empathetic, as opposed to more empathetic, and the reasons for this are unclear,” Toledo writes, recommending lectures on active listening and communication skills, among other measures. 

Read more

Oct 2 2014
Comments

In the Media: New Annual Event Honors Federal Nurses

This is part of the October 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Every May, the news media zooms in on nurses during National Nurses Week, held the second week of the month in honor of Florence Nightingale’s birthday.

Now, nurses are getting another turn in the media spotlight—but this time in September.

Or at least that’s the goal of Federal Nurses Week, a new annual event held in recognition of the nation’s 100,000 federally employed nurses. The event, held this year between Sept. 22 and Sept. 28, is sponsored by the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE). J. David Cox, RN, national president of AFGE, is a nurse and also serves on the national executive board of the AFL-CIO.

During the week, supporters were encouraged to host an event to recognize a federal nurse or nurses and spread the word about the importance of federal nurses through posts to social media sites or letters to the editor of newspapers or other publications. AFGE is also urging Congress to pass a resolution recognizing the federal nurse workforce.

Read more

Oct 2 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: Autism and birth order, nurse staffing and underweight infants, long-term care insurance, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

There is an increased risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) among children born less than one year or more than five years after the birth of their next oldest sibling, Forbes reports. The study, led by RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna Keely Cheslack-Postava, PhD, MSPH, analyzed the records of 7,371 children born between 1987 and 2005, using data from the Finnish Prenatal Study of Autism. About a third of the children had been diagnosed with ASD by 2007. Researchers found that the risk of ASD for children born less than 12 months after their prior sibling was 50 percent higher than it was for children born two to five years after their prior sibling. “The theory is that the timing between pregnancies changes the prenatal environment for the developing fetus,” Cheslack-Postava said. 

The health outcomes and quality of care for underweight black infants could greatly improve with more nurses on staff at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, according to a study funded by RWJF’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI). The study, led by Eileen Lake, PhD, RN, FAAN, found that nurse understaffing and practice environments were worse at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, contributing to adverse outcomes for very low birthweight babies born in those facilities, reports Health Canal. More information is available on the INQRI Blog. The study was covered by Advance Healthcare Network for Nurses, among other outlets.

Because of a “medical-industrial complex” that provides financial incentives to overuse and fragment health care, patients nearing the end of their lives need an advocate to fight for their interests, Joan Teno, MD, MS, writes in an opinion piece for the New York Times. Teno encourages readers to “find a family member or friend who can advocate for the health care that you want and need. Find someone to ask the hard questions: What is your prognosis? What are the benefits and risks of treatments? Find someone not afraid of white coats.” Teno is an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. 

Read more

Oct 1 2014
Comments

Quotable Quotes About Nursing, October 2014

This is part of the October 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“I’ve learned over the last couple of years, as my mother came to rely more on nursing assistance at home for daily tasks, that health care is all about what happens between people. It’s the relationship of trust between the patient and family members and a universe of medical professionals. Nowhere is the relationship more vital than between patient and nurse.

Nurses are the front line of care. Doctors parachute into our world and we into theirs, but nurses stay on the ground from crucial moment to moment.”
--Marsha Mercer, independent journalist, They Put the ‘Care’ in Health Care, The (Lynchburg, Va.) News & Advance, Sept. 28, 2014

“Unfortunately, due to the culture of the health care industry, nurses have usually taken a back seat to physicians and administrators when it comes to changing the policies and practices of optimizing care. However, there is a wealth of evidence that points to the vital and increasing leadership role nurses are taking in health care practices around the country.  ... The message to hospital administrators should be clear—if you’re looking to improve the quality of care and reduce costs, try talking to the people working on the front lines every day—talk to a nurse.”
--Rob Szczerba, PhD, MS, CEO of X Tech Ventures, Looking to Transform Healthcare? Ask a Nurse, Forbes, September 23, 2014

“I’ve been a nurse for 25 years and love what I do. But when we are forced to work overtime, it adds unnecessary stress, frustration and fatigue that can impair your ability to function at your best. You can’t think straight when you’ve been working 16 hours.”
--Terri Menichelli, Nurse., State Auditor Will Look into Health Care Overtime Law, The Citizen’s Voice (Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania), Sept. 19, 2014 

Read more

Sep 25 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: Unintended consequences of shorter ER wait times, Ebola response, vaccinations and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

Policies aimed at shortening emergency departments waiting times may have unintended consequences, including unnecessary admission of patients who might be better off being discharged, RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna Renee Hsia, MD, MSc, tells Health Day. Hsia published two research letters in JAMA Internal Medicine on emergency wait times at urban and rural hospitals. RWJF Clinical Scholar alumnus Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS, author of an accompanying editorial, seconds Hsia’s concerns. “Medicare started advertising waiting times at ERs about a year ago. And that will be a strong incentive for hospitals to work on and improve their waiting times...[h]owever, some of the hospitals with longer waiting times, like teaching hospitals, care for the most complex patients who often don’t have access to regular care. And these places are, by nature and necessity, going to have longer waiting times,” he warned. The article was republished by U.S. News & World Report and Health.com, among other outlets.

CBS Detroit interviews Howard Markel, MD, PhD, FAAP, recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, for a story on President Obama’s decision to send American troops and medical and logistical support to Africa to stop Ebola from spreading. “It is a humanitarian gesture,” Markel said. “I applaud the president for doing it. Do I wish as a physician and an epidemiologist it was done earlier? Yes, of course.” Markel says he does not expect the virus to spread to the United States. He is also quoted in the New Republic and Politico.

In an op-ed for the New York Times, Jason Karlawish, MD, explores the balance between risk-avoidance and enjoying life as we age. Noting that 3.6 percent of the population is 80 or older, he writes that as Americans age, “life is heavily prescribed not only with the behaviors we should avoid, but the medications we ought to take.” Aging in the 21st century is all about risk reduction, but “[w]e desire not simply to pursue life, but happiness” and “medicine is important, but it’s not the only means to this happiness,” Karlawish writes. National investment in communities and services that improve the quality of our aging may be one answer, he adds. Karlawish is a recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research.

Read more

Sep 18 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: Antibiotic overuse, sexual assault nurse examiners, diaper banks, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient Anthony So, MD, MPA, co-authors a piece in the News & Observer (Raleigh, North Carolina) about the need to reduce the overuse of antibiotics, in both humans and animals. Overuse accelerates the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that half of human antibiotic use and much animal antibiotic use is unnecessary, the article says. So calls for public policies that create incentives for farmers to decrease use of antibiotics and that limit antibiotic use in animals to disease treatment, rather than growth-promotion or as a substitute for hygiene and infection-control.

In Chicago, most children with asthma or food allergies do not have a health management form on file at school, leaving their schools without information they might need in emergencies, according to a study by RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH that was covered by Reuters Health. Researchers analyzed 2012-13 school year data on more than 400,000 Chicago schoolchildren, including 18,287 with asthma and 4,250 with a food allergy. Only a quarter of the asthmatic students and half of those with a food allergy had a health management plan on file. The study was also covered by The Chicago Tribune, Fox News, The Baltimore Sun, and Red Orbit, among other outlets.

RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars alumna Angela Frederick Amar, PhD, RN, FAAN, publishes an op-ed on Talking Points Memo about the report from the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, Not Alone. Amar notes that effective response to campus sexual assault should include medical care for survivors, and that Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs) are trained to tend to the medical and emotional needs of survivors and collect forensic evidence. In other institutions with high rates of sexual violence, such as the military, SANEs are considered an essential part of treatment for victims of sexual violence, Amar writes.

Read more