Category Archives: Nursing

Nov 26 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The November 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the November issue.

RWJF Grantees Help Veterans Become Nurses
With unemployment a problem for many veterans, nurse educators are launching innovative programs to turn veterans into nurses—a “win-win” solution for the military, the health care system and patients, proponents say. The programs address both the looming nurse shortage and the fact that veterans cannot get academic credit for health care experiences that took place in the battlefield.

‘Ebola Care is Nursing Care’
The Ebola outbreak is shining a spotlight on the critical—but often unseen—work of nursing in the United States and abroad, nurse leaders say. Nurses are mounting the main caregiving response to the deadly virus, according to Sheila Davis, DNP, ANP-BC, FAAN, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow who recently returned from Liberia and Sierra Leone. Nurses also are educating the public about how the disease is transmitted and dispelling sometimes-unfounded fears.

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Nov 25 2014
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All People, At Any Age or Ability, Have Resilient Potential

Sarah L. Szanton, PhD, ANP, FAAN, is an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars program. On December 5, RWJF will explore this topic further at its first Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health. Learn more about it.

Sarah L. Szanton

Resilience is not just an individual character trait. There are resilient families, communities, and societies. 

Scholars Forum 2014 Logo

Within the individual, there are resilient organs, cells, and genetic expressions. Although many people who experience health disparities are resilient on the individual level—they are optimistic, committed, loving, bright—the groups of people who suffer from health disparities (such as non-English speakers, racial and ethnic minorities, and those living in poverty) draw on their personal resilience daily, but suffer from reduced contact with the resilient potential of communities and society overall. 

To me, building a Culture of Health means developing multiple layers of resilient possibilities so that each person’s cells, organs, families, communities, and society are able to respond to stressors, challenges, and opportunities with resilient potential.

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Nov 24 2014
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Conference to Focus on Integrating Policy into Nursing Curricula

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico is hosting a one-day conference this winter for PhD and DNP nurse faculty who seek to better integrate health policy into their curricula. It will be held on January 27 at the Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego.

Hotel Del Coronado The Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego

The conference will feature interprofessional panels of speakers who will discuss strategies to develop faculty and student expertise in policy analysis and research. Panel topics will include:

  • shaping health policy leadership through doctoral nurse education;
  • exercising health policy leadership through nursing and community organizations;
  • strategies for enriching doctoral health policy education; and
  • integrating health policy content into doctoral nursing programs.

The conference supports RWJF’s work to promote a Culture of Health across America. It aims to support faculty in preparing students to address health policy issues, developing programs of research that relate to health policy, and integrating an understanding of social determinants of health into policy analysis and research.

More information on the conference is here and registration is here.

Nov 21 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: Strengthening Long-Term Care in Arkansas

Chris Love, MMin, MSLE, is the program director for the Arkansas Community Foundation, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Planning for Workforce Development in Geriatric and Long-Term Care.

PIN Logo

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

Chris Love

The PIN journey with Arkansas Community Foundation and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), among other partners, has been one of both providence and progress. It was in the fall of 2008 that we were approached by leaders from UAMS with the idea for us to become partners with them in this endeavor.

At first, the idea seemed daunting. Then, after some consideration by our senior leadership, it became an open door for opportunity—an opportunity to leverage the structure and resources of our foundation to complement the expertise of our colleagues and friends at UAMS to address a major issue of mutual concern: the aging population in our state and the significant shortage of adequately prepared nurses to care for that population. Not long into the partnership, our organizations realized this would be a match made in heaven.

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Nov 20 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: Keeping the Pipeline Flowing

Bobbie D. Bagley, MS, RN, MPH, CPH, is director of public health and an instructor in the nursing program at Rivier University. She played a key role in the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) Pipeline Project. Paula Smith, MBA, is director of the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center and is in the doctoral program in education, leadership and learning at Rivier University. She oversaw implementation of the Nursing Quest summer camps, the Diverse Nurse Network, and the Minority Nursing Student Support Program components of the Pipeline Project. 

PIN Logo

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

As New Hampshire becomes increasingly diverse, partners in the state have joined together to promote workforce diversity. These are exciting times. Support from RWJF and other funders provided the opportunity to implement the New Hampshire Nursing Diversity Pipeline Project—a partner-driven effort to increase diversity within the nursing workforce as well as nursing faculty. Lead partners included the Endowment for Health, the New Hampshire Office of Minority Health and Refugee Affairs, the BRINGIT!!! Program (Bringing Refugees, Immigrants and Neighbors, Gently Into Tomorrow—an after school enrichment program), and the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center (AHEC). In addition, this Pipeline Program engaged partners from a variety of organizations in the state, including hospitals, medical practices, youth-serving organizations, middle and high schools, as well as nursing leaders in practice and academia.

In addition, this Pipeline Program engaged partners from a variety of organizations in the state, including hospitals, medical practices, youth-serving organizations, middle and high schools, as well as nursing leaders in practice and academia.

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Nov 20 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: An Urban-Rural Model to Increase the Number of Baccalaureate Nurses

Darlene Curley, MS, RN, FAAN, is executive director of the Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN).

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

PIN Logo
Darlene Curley

Human Capital Blog: Why did the Jonas Center decide to become a part of PIN? What were your goals for the project?

Darlene Curley: There were three things that were attractive about PIN. First, there was this project itself, which was developing a pathway for associate degree to baccalaureate nurses. That’s critical for building a highly educated workforce and a pipeline for preparing the next generation of faculty. The second reason was the partnership funding model. It related to the Jonas Center’s philosophy that we should be funding projects together with others in nursing, but also in interdisciplinary models for health. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along.

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Nov 19 2014
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The Imperative to Improve Health Literacy

Joy P. Deupree, PhD, MSN, APRN-BC, is an assistant professor at the University of Alabama (UAB) School of Nursing and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellow. She is engaged in community participatory research studies on health literacy. For 12 years, Deupree has taught a campus-wide elective on health literacy and has been a guest lecturer on the topic at the UAB schools of medicine, dentistry and public health. She founded the Alliance of International Nurses for Improved Health Literacy and established a nursing special interest group for the Health Literacy Annual Research Conference.

Joy Deupree

Health literacy is extremely important to building a culture of health. Basic understanding of health care information is essential if people are to live healthy lives, but an alarming number of American adults report poor understanding of health care instructions. 

This year marks the 10-year anniversary of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion.While progress has been made, the work has really just begun. We can no longer blame the patient for poor health literacy, and we should keep in mind that limited health literacy affects us as all and contributes to increased health care costs. 

American Public Health Association Meeting & Expo

The IOM report defines health literacy as “the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.” These skills involve not only reading ability but also numeracy. Failure to develop the necessary skills to manage health care can cost millions of dollars as well as add to human suffering and even cause death.

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Nov 14 2014
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Misfortune at Birth

Eileen Lake, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Jeannette Rogowski, PhD, are co-principal investigators of a study, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative, that generated evidence linking nurse staffing and work environments to infant outcomes in a national sample of neonatal intensive care units.* A new documentary, “Surviving Year One,” examines infant mortality in Rochester, N.Y. and nationwide. It is being shown on PBS and World Channel stations (check local listings). Read more about it on the RWJF Culture of Health Blog here and here.

Eileen Lake (Smaller photo) Eileen Lake

Are some premature babies simply born in the wrong place? Premature babies are fragile at birth and most infant deaths in this country are due to prematurity.  It is well established that blacks have poorer health than whites in our country, but the origin of these disparities is still a mystery.  It’s possible that the hospital in which a child is born may tell us why certain population groups have poorer health.

A new study by University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers investigators that I led shows that seven out of ten black infants with very low birth weights (less than 3.2 lbs.) in the United States have the simple misfortune of being born in inferior hospitals. What makes these hospitals inferior?  A big component is lower nurse staffing ratios and work environments that are less supportive of excellent nursing practice than other hospitals.  Our study, which was funded by the RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative, indicates that the hospitals in which infants are born can affect their health all their lives. 

Jeannette Rogowski Jeannette Rogowski

A Brighter Future

What can be done to make these hospitals better?  A first step would be to include nurses in decisions at all levels of the hospital, as recommended by the Institute of Medicine to position nursing to lead change and advance health. Laws in seven states require hospitals to have staff nurses participate in developing plans for safe staffing levels on all units.

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Nov 13 2014
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Addressing the Needs of Female Veterans Who Have Experienced Violence and Harassment

Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN, is director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars program and Anna D. Wolf chair and professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.  Angela Amar, PhD, RN, FAAN, is an associate professor at the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory University and an alumna of the RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars program.

Jacquelyn Campbell Jacquelyn Campbell

As two scholars who have worked in research, practice and policy arenas around issues of gender-based violence for years, we honor our veterans this week by paying tribute to the Pentagon and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for addressing intimate partner and sexual violence among active duty and returning military and their families, and urge continued system-wide involvement and innovative solutions.  

In our work, we’ve heard outrageous, painful stories. One female servicemember explained to Angela why she was ignoring the sexual harassment she experienced. She knew that hearing that she was inferior because she was a woman, being called “Kitty” instead of her name, and having the number 69 used in place of any relevant number was harassing. She knew it was wrong. But she had decided that she would not let it bother her. I can acknowledge that he is a jerk, but I can’t let that affect me.  

Angela Amar Angela Amar

I can’t let his behavior define me as a person. On some level this may seem like an accurate way of dealing with a problem person. However, sexual harassment isn’t just about one obnoxious person. Not telling the story doesn’t make the behavior go away. Rather, it sends the message that the behavior is acceptable and that sexist comments are a normal part of the lexicon of male/female interactions.

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Nov 13 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: EpiPens in schools, suicide prevention, financial incentives for wellness, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

A study by RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH, shows that keeping supplies of epinephrine, commonly known as EpiPens, in schools saves lives, Health Day reports. Epinephrine injections are given in response to life-threatening allergic reactions to food or to insect stings. Gupta’s study found that epinephrine was administered to 35 children and three adults in Chicago public schools during the 2012-13 school year. “We were surprised to see that of those who received the epinephrine, more than half of the reactions were first-time incidents,” Gupta said. “Many children are trying foods for the first time at school, and therefore it is critical that schools are prepared for a possible anaphylactic reaction.”  Forty-one states have laws recommending schools stock epinephrine, according to the article.

Matt Wray, PhD, MA, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus, writes in Medical Xpress that when it comes to preventing suicides, it’s important to focus some attention on how a person seeks to end his or her life. According to the article, suicide-prevention research has shown that when people who have begun to act on suicidal impulses find that access to their chosen method is blocked, many do not seek out other means. “Most people don’t have a backup plan,” Wray writes. “So when their initial attempt is stalled, the destructive impulse often passes. Moreover, contrary to what many believe, people who attempt suicide more than once are rare. Less than 10 percent of those who survive an attempt ever end up dying by suicide.”

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