Category Archives: Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico

Nov 24 2014
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Conference to Focus on Integrating Policy into Nursing Curricula

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico is hosting a one-day conference this winter for PhD and DNP nurse faculty who seek to better integrate health policy into their curricula. It will be held on January 27 at the Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego.

Hotel Del Coronado The Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego

The conference will feature interprofessional panels of speakers who will discuss strategies to develop faculty and student expertise in policy analysis and research. Panel topics will include:

  • shaping health policy leadership through doctoral nurse education;
  • exercising health policy leadership through nursing and community organizations;
  • strategies for enriching doctoral health policy education; and
  • integrating health policy content into doctoral nursing programs.

The conference supports RWJF’s work to promote a Culture of Health across America. It aims to support faculty in preparing students to address health policy issues, developing programs of research that relate to health policy, and integrating an understanding of social determinants of health into policy analysis and research.

More information on the conference is here and registration is here.

Oct 31 2014
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RWJF Milestones, October 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Linda Aiken, PhD, FAAN, FRCN, RN, has won the Institute of Medicine’s Leinhard Award in recognition of her “rigorous research demonstrating the importance of nursing care and work environments in achieving safe, effective, patient-centered, and affordable health care.” The director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Aiken serves on the National Advisory Committee of the RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and is a research manager for the Future of Nursing National Research Agenda.

A number of RWJF Scholars and Fellows were recently elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine:

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Aug 25 2014
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RWJF Milestones, August 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

James S. Jackson, PhD, a 2009 recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, has been appointed by President Obama to serve on the National Science Foundation’s National Science Board. Jackson is a professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and director of its Institute for Social Research.

Geraldine “Polly” Bednash, PhD, RN, FAAN, will receive the National League for Nursing’s (NLN) highest honor, the President’s Award, at the 2014 NLN Education Summit in mid-September. Bednash is the recently retired chief executive officer of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and director of New Careers in Nursing, a joint initiative of RWJF and AACN focused on increasing diversity in the nursing workforce.

Sally Cohen, PhD, RN, FAAN, has been selected as the 2014-2015 Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. The program provides a yearlong leadership opportunity to participate in shaping health policy. Cohen was also named editor-in-chief of the journal, Policy, Politics & Nursing Practice.  She is director of the Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico.

Lainie Ross, MD, PhD, a 2013 recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, has been named a 2014 Guggenheim Fellow. Ross will use her fellowship year to research the relationship between ethics and genetics for a book, currently titled, From Peapods to Whole Genomes: Incidental Findings and Unintended Consequences in a Post-Mendelian World. The fellowship is awarded by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to recipients with “demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts.”

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Aug 20 2014
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The Importance of Emphasizing Healthy Habits for All Children

Carolyn Montoya, PhD, PNP, is associate professor and interim practice chair at the University of New Mexico College of Nursing and a recent graduate of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico College of Nursing.

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Human Capital Blog: Congratulations on your award from the Western Institute of Nursing! The award honors new nurse researchers. What does it mean for you and for your career?

Carolyn Montoya: In addition to being quite an honor, receiving the Carol Lindeman Award for new researchers from the Western Institute of Nursing motivates me to continue to pursue my research. I am sure people can relate to the fact that being in the student mode is so very intense that once you finish you need some recovery time. Then you start wanting to use the research skills you worked so hard to obtain, and this award has helped to re-energize my commitment to research.

HCB: The award recognizes your study on children’s self-perception of weight. Please tell us what you found.

Montoya: I was very interested to see if there was a difference between how Hispanic children viewed their self-perception in regard to weight compared with white children. Seventy percent of my study population was Hispanic, and my overall response rate was 42 percent. I found that Hispanic children, ages 8 to 11, are not better or worse than white children in their ability to accurately perceive their weight status. Most surprising, and a bit concerning, was the fact that one-third of the sample expressed a desire to be underweight.

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Jun 23 2014
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RWJF Milestones, June 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Emery Brown, MD, PhD, an alumnus of the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient James Perrin, PhD, is the new president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. He took office on January 1, 2014, beginning a one-year term.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has named Deborah E. Trautman, PhD, RN, as its new chief executive officer, effective June 16. Trautman, an RWJF Health Policy Fellows program alumna, currently serves as executive director of the Center for Health Policy and Healthcare Transformation at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

The American College of Physicians (ACP), the nation’s largest medical specialty organization, has voted Wayne Riley, MD, MPH, MBA, its president-elect. Riley is a former RWJF senior health policy associate.

Kenneth B. Chance, Sr., D.D.S. has been appointed dean of the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and will begin his duties on July 1, 2014. He is an alumnus of the RWJF Health Policy Fellows program, and served on its national advisory committee. His is a current member of the national advisory committee of the RWJF Summer Medical and Dental Education Program.

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Apr 2 2014
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RWJF Milestones, April 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Susan B. Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, RWJF’s senior advisor for nursing and director of its Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, has been named co-chair of the newly formed External Nurse Advisory Board (ENAB) for the Center for Nursing Advancement (CFNA) at UnitedHealth Group. The goal of the ENAB is to “inform, create and evolve nursing best practices, and advance the nursing profession.”

Angelina Jolie has signed on as executive producer of Difret, a film by RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumna Mehret Mandefro, MD, MSc, AB. The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January, where it won the World Cinema Dramatic Audience Award, then went on to receive the Audience Award at the Berlin International Film Festival in February. The film tells the story of a young Ethiopian girl who challenges the tradition of “telefa,” the practice of abduction in marriage, usually of young girls. Read more about Mandefro’s film.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has voted Juliann Sebastian, PhD, MSN, its president-elect. Sebastian, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows alumna, is dean of the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing. She will serve as president of AACN from 2016 to 2018. The organization represents more than 740 nursing schools nationwide.

RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna Jacqueline Stevens, PhD, has been named a 2013 Guggenheim Fellow for the Humanities. Her fellowship is in U.S. History.

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Feb 27 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The February 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the February issue.

Preparing Nurses for Leadership in Public Policy
Many nurse education programs, including those that confer doctoral degrees, fall short in educating nurses about public policy, leaving them unprepared to maximize their expertise in policy arenas. To help change that, the RWJF Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico hosted a recent conference that brought together leading nurse educators, public policy experts, social scientists, and others. The goal was to identify and share effective ways to prepare students in doctoral (PhD and DNP) nursing programs to be health policy leaders. Talking to lawmakers is “high-stakes communication,” one speaker said, and nurses need to know how to do it.

Nurse Leader Urges Nurses to Study Political Science, Too
Nancy Ridenour, PhD, APRN, FAAN, has combined a lifelong passion for policy with a drive to improve public health. Throughout her career, she has fought state laws that prevented Nurse Practitioners from practicing to the top of their education and training, and spoken out on health policies affecting access to care for patients in rural communities. “Policy is a tool to foster social change. Leadership and expertise in health policy ensure that nursing expertise is used to improve the health of the nation,” Ridenour says.

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Feb 19 2014
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School-Based Health Centers: A Bridge to a Healthier Future

Elizabeth Dickson, MSN, RN, is a fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at University of New Mexico. Earlier in her career, she worked at a school-based health center (SBHC). This post is part of the “Health Care in 2014” series.

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As a public health nurse, I have worked with children in schools for much of my career.  From 2009 until 2013, I worked at a SBHC in New Mexico that was located in an alternative high school in southern Albuquerque. Although small, many students at this school came from families of mixed immigration status and had experienced high levels of street violence, alcohol and drug abuse and overdose, suicide, poverty and food scarcity, minimal health care access, and high teen pregnancy rates.

These kids saw and experienced more than many outsiders of the community could have imagined. The SBHC was open one day a week during school hours and employed a staff that included a nurse practitioner, a physician assistant, public health nurses, administrative staff, and mental health counselors. I worked with an incredible team that provided many health services and screenings, including mental health support, in the limited time that we had.

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Jan 31 2014
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Resolve to Address Violence Against Women and Girls

Abigail L. Reese, CNM, MSN, is a fellow with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico. She received her undergraduate degree from Princeton University and her master of science in nursing at the Yale School of Nursing. She has worked at a birth center on the U.S./Mexico border, and coordinated a federal women’s health grant in Vermont. This post is part of the “Health Care in 2014” series.

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My resolution for the U.S. health care system in 2014 is to make strides in addressing one of the greatest health disparities affecting women and girls in this society and the world over: the experience of interpersonal and sexual violence. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) tells us that, in this country, one out of every five women has experienced rape or attempted rape. One in four has experienced “severe physical violence” at the hands of an intimate partner. Furthermore, the evidence tells us that victimization and its consequences begin early. Nearly half of all women who experience rape are assaulted before the age of 18, and 35 percent will be re-victimized during their lifetime.

Those of us who provide health care services to women are first-hand witnesses to the health-related consequences of interpersonal and sexual violence. These women are at greater risk for a range of potentially devastating health problems including: debilitating depression and anxiety, substance use disorders, sexually transmitted infections, unwanted pregnancies, and giving birth to preterm or low birth weight infants. They have higher reported rates of frequent headaches, chronic pain (including chronic pelvic pain), diabetes, asthma, and irritable bowel syndrome, among other conditions. Therefore, many of the symptoms and conditions that bring women into our care are related to their experiences of violence.

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May 31 2013
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Health Inequities Harm Everyone

LisaMarie Turk, RN, MSN, is a fellow with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico, working toward a PhD in nursing with a health policy concentration. She was awarded a Hearst Foundation Scholarship in 2010. This is part of a series of posts looking at diversity in the health care workforce.

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Ample scientific and empirical evidence supports increasing diversity in the health care workforce in order to decrease health disparities and advance health equity.

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I am a registered nurse and PhD student in Nursing and Health Policy at the University of New Mexico. New Mexico is known for its depth of cultural diversity; however, this state joins the nation in experiencing negligible diversity in its health care workforce. 

I was honored with the opportunity to complete a policy internship focusing on nursing workforce diversity at the Division of Nursing of the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Bureau of Health Professions. From this experience, I gained increased awareness and resources to affect change in nursing and health care workforce diversity in New Mexico.

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